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Stanford University
European and American Art: Late Renaissance through 1900
Ongoing Exhibition

European and American Art: Late Renaissance through 1900

January 19, 2022–

Auguste François Willème (French, 1830–1905), "Portrait of Matilde de Aguilera y Gamboa, Lady of Fontagud" (detail), c. 1865. White bisque porcelain. Cantor Arts Center Collection, Robert and Pauline Sears Fund, 2021.94

Auguste François Willème (France, 1830–1905), Portrait of Matilde de Aguilera y Gamboa, Lady of Fontagud (detail), c. 1865. White bisque porcelain. Cantor Arts Center Collection, Robert and Pauline Sears Fund, 2021.94

Robert Mondavi Family Gallery

 

This exhibition showcases highlights from the Cantor Art Center’s rich collection of later European and early American art in the first substantial refresh of the Robert Mondavi Family Gallery in over five years. The paintings and sculptures in this gallery offer a selective overview of significant developments and genres of Western art from the late Renaissance through 1900. Mythological and historical protagonists from antiquity are reimagined and adapted to suit new and changing circumstances, while Christian saints in contemporary dress translate biblical stories for modern audiences. Sumptuous still lifes allude to the pleasures and transience of life while ostentatiously displaying the spoils of colonialism, and sensitively painted portraits seem as though they could speak across time. Enhancing these selections from the Cantor’s collection are a number of significant loans, as well as an exciting new acquisition of a portrait statuette that offers an intriguing glimpse of the nineteenth-century origins of 3D printing and other technologies that proliferate in our contemporary, digital world.

 

This exhibition is organized by the Cantor Arts Center. We gratefully acknowledge support from the Theodore and Frances Geballe Pre-19th Century Art Exhibition Fund, the Clumeck Endowment Fund, and the Loughlin Family Exhibition Fund.

 

 


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The Cantor is open to the public at 100% indoor capacity. Free, all-day reservations are required for all visitors, including members. Get yours here.

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Directions

The Cantor Arts Center is located at the intersection of Museum Way and Lomita Drive in the heart of the arts district on the Stanford campus. The Cantor faces the Bing Concert Hall across Palm Drive, northwest of The Oval and the Main Quad.

328 Lomita Drive at Museum Way
Stanford, CA 94305-5060

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