The Cantor Arts Center offers myriad opportunities for Stanford faculty and students and the public at large to participate in programs, classes, and art-related events. Most of the programs are free. See the calendar for a full list, explore the links at left for information, or sign up to receive our monthly email newsletter. The Center is fully accessible to people with disabilities.

Art Practice Faculty Talk: Xiaoze Xie

Thursday, January 19, 6pm, Cantor Auditorium

Xiaoze Xie, Paul L. & Phyllis Wattis Professor of Art at Stanford University, is an internationally recognized artist who has exhibited extensively in the US and abroad. Xie received Master of Fine Art degrees from the Central Academy of Arts & Design in Beijing and the University of North Texas.  Xie has been the recipient of numerous grants and awards including the Painter and Sculptor’s Grant from the Joan Mitchell Foundation in 2013 and the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant in 2003.

This is part of a continuing series of Art Practice faculty talks at the Cantor to welcome the Department of Art and Art History to their new home in the McMurtry Building.

 

Gallery Talk with Elizabeth Mitchell - The Wonder of Everyday Life: Dutch Golden Age Prints

Saturday, January 21, 12:30pm, Halperin Gallery

Elizabeth Mitchell, Burton and Deedee McMurtry Curator of Drawings, Prints and Photographs, leads a gallery talk through The Wonder of Everyday Life: Dutch Golden Age PrintsWhile the Dutch republic experienced unprecedented economic prosperity in the 17th century, printmakers were exceptionally sensitive - and sometimes obsessive - when rendering the details of everyday life. Their style introduced visual realism to the dramatic and dynamic compositions characteristic of the Baroque. A  hallmark of Dutch prints created during this Golden Age is their depiction of the grit, dark corners and textures present in the mundane objects featured in domestic scenes, landscapes, portraits, and even compositions interpreting literature or religious texts.

Intersections: Zainab Bahrani

Thursday, February 2, 6pm, Oshman Hall at McMurtry Building

Zainab Bahrani is the Edith Porada Professor of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University, New York. Bahrani is a specialist in ancient art and archaeology and the recipient of several awards for her work including a 2003 Guggenheim Fellowship, and awards from the Getty Foundation, the Mellon Foundation and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Her most recent book, The Infinite Image: Art, Time and the Aesthetic Dimension in Antiquity (Reaktion/University of Chicago Press, 2014) won the Lionel Trilling Book prize. Her forthcoming book, Art of Mesopotamia (Thames and Hudson) will be released in January 2017.

Bahrani presents "Methexis Images: A Counter History of Art." From the ontology of images to the art of the sublime, Mesopotamian art works and the many ancient texts that describe them, their function and their effects, compel us to unthink our theoretical preconceptions and aesthetic categories. This lecture will present methexis as a representational mode that is quite different from mimesis, the concept around which the history of art and philosophical theories of representation have been written. This early history of the image shows that universalizing aesthetic claims will obviously be flawed unless they take into account the extensive historical evidence from non-European traditions.

 

Bobbie and Mike Wilsey Distinguished Lecture for 2017: Trevor Paglen 
Wednesday, February 8, 7pm, Bing Concert Hall
Trevor Paglen discusses his genre-defying work: image-making, sculpture, investigative journalism, writing, engineering, and other disciplines. Among his chief concerns are learning how to see the historical moment we live in and developing the means to imagine alternative futures. 


Gallery Talk with Elizabeth Mitchell - The Wonder of Everyday Life: Dutch Golden Age Prints

Saturday, February 25, 12:30pm, Halperin Gallery

Elizabeth Mitchell, Burton and Deedee McMurtry Curator of Drawings, Prints and Photographs, leads a gallery talk through The Wonder of Everyday Life: Dutch Golden Age PrintsWhile the Dutch republic experienced unprecedented economic prosperity in the 17th century, printmakers were exceptionally sensitive - and sometimes obsessive - when rendering the details of everyday life. Their style introduced visual realism to the dramatic and dynamic compositions characteristic of the Baroque. A  hallmark of Dutch prints created during this Golden Age is their depiction of the grit, dark corners and textures present in the mundane objects featured in domestic scenes, landscapes, portraits, and even compositions interpreting literature or religious texts.

Lecture: A Mushroom Perspective on Sacred Geography
Thursday, March 30, 6pm, Cantor Auditorium

In East Asian cultures, the lingzhi mushroom was believed to be a spiritual organism that thrived only at sacred sites. Drawing from the Cantor’s rich collection of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean art, A Mushroom Perspective on Sacred Geography brings together a wide variety of objects (painting, ceramic, jade, lacquer, and works on paper) to examine the dynamic interconnections between humans, natural organisms, and sacred landscapes. Exhibition curator, Yu-chuan Phoenix Chen, a PhD candidate in the Department of Art & Art history, will discuss the exhibition which ultimately urges us to consider our own longstanding and ongoing relationship with nature. 


Intersections: Njideka Akunyili Crosby

Thursday, April 13, 7pm, CEMEX Auditorium

Internationally acclaimed artist Njideka Akunyili Crosby in conversation with Alison Gass, Associate Director for Exhibitions, Collections and Curatorial Affairs at the Cantor Arts Center.

Drawing on art historical, political and personal references, Njideka Akunyili Crosby creates densely layered figurative compositions that, precise in style, nonetheless conjure the complexity of contemporary experience. Akunyili Crosby was born in Nigeria, where she lived until the age of sixteen. In 1999 she moved to the United States, where she has remained since that time. Her cultural identity combines strong attachments to the country of her birth and to her adopted home, a hybrid identity that is reflected in her work. 


Art Practice Faculty Talk Series: Jenny Odell

Thursday, April 27, at 6pm, Cantor Auditorium

Jenny Odell combines research, aesthetics, and found online material in an effort to parse the infrastructural networks at the heart of the everyday. Her work has been exhibited at the Contemporary Jewish Museum and YBCA in San Francisco, Les Rencontres d'Arles in France, East Wing in Dubai, Apexart in New York, and the Google headquarters. Odell has also been an artist in residence at Recology SF, YBCA, the Palo Alto Art Center, and Facebook.


This is part of a continuing series of Art Practice faculty talks at the Cantor to welcome the Department of Art and Art History to their new home in the McMurtry Building.



 






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