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Object Narratives


Learning Guides

Special object narratives for use with Stanford coursework and research

Recasting Rodin

Patrick R. Crowley, PhD
Associate Curator of European Art

 

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Object Narrative | Recasting Rodin

Artists & Anatomists

Elizabeth Kathleen Mitchell, PhD
Burton and Deedee McMurtry Curator, and Director of the Curatorial Fellowship Program

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Object Narratives | Artists & Anatomists

Photography & Text

Maggie Dethloff, PhD
Assistant Curator of Photography and New Media
 

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Object Narratives | Photography & Text

Looking at Each Other: American Portraiture

Aleesa Alexander, PhD
Assistant Curator of American Art

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Titus Kaphar, U.S.A., b. 1976. Page 4 of Jefferson’s “Farm Book,”... 2018.

Recasting Rodin


Recasting Rodin

Patrick R. Crowley, PhD
Associate Curator of European Art

 

Object Narrative | Recasting Rodin
Object Narratives | Recasting Rodin

Recasting Rodin

Patrick R. Crowley, PhD
Associate Curator of European Art

What makes Rodin’s sculpture so modern, it has been argued, is the way in which he makes visible an aesthetic of process—how, in other words, he takes traditional sculpture apart and puts it back together again in new and daring ways.

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Artists & Anatomists


Artists & Anatomists

Elizabeth Kathleen Mitchell, PhD
Burton and Deedee McMurtry Curator, and Director of the Curatorial Fellowship Program

 

Object Narratives | Artists & Anatomists
Object Narratives | Artists & Anatomists

Artists & Anatomists

Elizabeth Kathleen Mitchell, PhD
Burton and Deedee McMurtry Curator, and Director of the Curatorial Fellowship Program

After the sixteenth century, European artists gained knowledge of human anatomy studying live models and attending anatomical demonstrations held at academies and studios—or sought out work with medical men with access to corpses. Whether created to represent an empirical or imagined encounter, these representations of the body often reveal society’s conflicted feelings about anatomical study being research toward a greater good, or a perverse and sacrilegious violation.

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Photography & Text


Photography & Text

Maggie Dethloff, PhD
Assistant Curator of Photography and New Media

 

Object Narratives | Photography & Text
Object Narratives | Photography & Text

Photography & Text

Maggie Dethloff, PhD
Assistant Curator of Photography and New Media

These photographs typify various relationships of photo and text. In some instances, the text and photo are side by side, and in others, they are together within the borders of the image. Of the latter, some feature “found text”—words and phrases that already existed in the environment—while others include text that was added to the photograph.

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Looking at Each Other: American Portraiture


Looking at Each Other: American Portraiture

Aleesa Alexander, PhD
Assistant Curator of American Art

 

Titus Kaphar, U.S.A., b. 1976. Page 4 of Jefferson’s “Farm Book,”... 2018.
Looking at Each Other: American Portraiture

Looking at Each Other: American Portraiture

Aleesa Alexander, PhD
Assistant Curator of American Art

Here, a selection of American portrait paintings from the Cantor’s collection demonstrate how American artists have worked within the genre, and how the genre itself has changed over time. These paintings allow us to ask questions like: what types of faces do we typically expect to see in a painted portrait, and what faces are rarely, if ever, represented? What can portraits tell us about social histories in the United States? How have contemporary artists expanded the possibilities of portraiture?

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