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When Home Won't Let You Stay

Migration Through Contemporary Art



 

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Migration is not a new phenomenon, but it does change over time. Migrants move by choice—seeking better education or financial security—or by force—fleeing war or persecution based on race, religion, gender, or sexual orientation. People are also displaced by economic forces like gentrification and ecological forces like natural disasters and the effects of climate change. In “Learn More,” we’ve provided bibliographies and resource lists to help you explore the subject further.

Bibliographies

In this section you will find recommended reading materials related to the exhibition.

Bibliographies

Resources

In this forthcoming section, you will find a list of resources, advocates, and supporting organizations that are involved with migration at different levels, both in government and nonprofit sectors.

Forthcoming

Spotlight on California

In this section you will find a list of sources that were used in support of the "Spotlight on California" corner in the exhibition and recommended articles for further reading.

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Bibliographies


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Resources

This section is forthcoming.


 

Spotlight on California

At the Cantor, this exhibition takes on additional nuances thanks to the unique migration histories of California and the Bay Area. California has long been and continues to be one of the most diverse states in the nation, but it’s important to consider the complex histories that shaped it. Our Spotlight on California corner features factoids about our national, regional, and local context. As you read, consider how past patterns of and restrictions on movement and habitation have influenced our current moment.

When Home Won't Let You Stay installation view at the Cantor Arts Center

Racial, ethnic, and cultural diversity in California and the Bay Area is shaped by the state's and the region's unique stories of immigration.

In 2018, 27% of people living in California and around 30% of those in the Bay Area were born outside of the country. But, California's diversity has also been shaped by local, national and global histories of slavery, genocide, forced displacement, racial violence and discriminatory laws. These histories and their effects continue to shape the Bay Area, California, and the nation, fueling ongoing racial justice and human rights movements.

An image depicting national demographics.
An image depicting California demographics.
An image depicting Bay Area demographics.

 

“Frequently Asked Questions: Indian Tribes and Tribal Communities in California,” California Tribal Court-State Court Forum, 2020.

 

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Daniel Macmillen Voskoboynik, “Colonialism Can’t Be Forgotten: It’s Still Destroying Peoples and Our Planet,“ openDemocracy, October 18, 2018.

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“Slave Trade: International Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade,” UnitedNations.org.

 

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Gillian Brockell, “California Was a Free State. But There Was Still Slavery. Now Reparations Are on the Table,” Washington Post, October 1, 2020.

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Ron Dugan, “A Moving Border, and the History of a Difficult Boundary,” USA Today, 2017.

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The Bracero History Archive, a project of the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media, George Mason University, the Smithsonian National Museum of American History, Brown University, and the Institute of Oral History at the University of Texas at El Paso.

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Erika Lee, “The Chinese Are Coming. How Can We Stop Them? Chinese Exclusion and the Origins of American Gatekeeping,” in Asian American Studies Now, ed. Jean Yu-wen Shen Wu and Thomas C. Chen (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2012), 143–167.

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Richard Gonzales, “Rebuilding Chinatown after the 1906 Quake,” NPR.org, April 12, 2006.

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Isabel Wilkerson, “The Long-Lasting Legacy of the Great Migration: When Millions of African-Americans Fled the South in Search of a Better Life, They Remade the Nation in Ways That Are Still Being Felt,” Smithsonian Magazine, September 2016.

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Eve Simister, “The African American Great Migration and San Mateo County,” La Peninsula: Journal of the San Mateo County Historical Association 44, no. 1 (Spring 2016).

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Matt Bowling, “Japanese-American Internment: Palo Alto's Deported Patriots,” PaloAltoHistory.org, 2012.

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Maria Cramer, “California Plans to Apologize to Japanese-Americans Over Internment,” New York Times, February 18, 2020.

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Max Nesterak, “Uprooted: The 1950s plan to erase Indian Country,” APMreports.org, November 1, 2019.

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Gloria Hillard, “Urban American Indians Rewrite Relocation’s Legacy,” NPR.org, January 7, 2012.

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Kim-Mai Cutler, “East of Palo Alto’s Eden: Race and the Formation of Silicon Valley,” Techcrunch.com, January 10, 2015.

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Herbert G. Ruffin, “The California Fair Housing Act [The Rumford Act] (1963–1968),” Black Past, June 5, 2011.

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Muzaffar Chishti, Faye Hipsman, and Isabel Ball, “Fifty Years On, the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act Continues to Reshape the United States,” MigrationPolicyInstitute.org, October 15, 2015.

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Jeff Desjardins, “Who Came to America, and When?,” Visual Capitalist, July 4, 2017.

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“Refugee Resettlement in California,” Refugee Council USA, January 1, 2019.

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Tatiana Sanchez, “With Refugee Resettlement at a Historic Low, California’s Melting Pot Is Slowly Changing,” Mercury News (San Jose, CA), September 24, 2018.

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Melissa Navas, “The Harsh Reality of Gentrification,” Divisadero, University of San Francisco, May 12, 2020.

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Ingrid Burrington, “Who Gets to Live in Silicon Valley? Google and San Jose Hope to Make the City More Affordable for Working- and Middle-Class Families, but They Make Matters Worse,” The Atlantic, June 25, 2018.

Read More

 

Sources

All URLs accessed November 30, 2020.

[i] “Most Diverse States 2020,” World Population Review, 2020, https://worldpopulationreview.com/state-rankings/most-diverse-states; Jeanne Batalova and Randy Capps, “U.S. Immigration Trends,” Migration Policy Institute, 2021, https://www.migrationpolicy.org/programs/data-hub/us-immigration-trends; “State Immigration Data Profiles,” Migration Policy Institute, 2020, https://www.migrationpolicy.org/data/state-profiles/state/demographics/CA; Hans Johnson and Sergio Sanchez, “Immigrants in California,” Public Policy Institute of California, May 2019, https://www.ppic.org/publication/immigrants-in-california/; “San Francisco Bay Area,” BayAreaCensus.CA.gov, 2010, http://www.bayareacensus.ca.gov/bayarea.htm; United States: ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates,” United States Census Bureau, 2018, https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?d=ACS%205-Year%20Estimates%20Data%20Profiles&tid=ACSDP5Y2018.DP05&hidePreview=true; “California: ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates,” United States Census Bureau, 2018, https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?g=0400000US06&d=ACS%205-Year%20Estimates%20Data%20Profiles&tid=ACSDP5Y2018.DP05; “Alameda County, CA: ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates,” United States Census Bureau, 2018, https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=ACSDP5Y2018.DP05%20Alameda%20County,%20California&g=0500000US06001&tid=ACSDP5Y2018.DP05&hidePreview=true; “Contra Costa County, CA: ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates,” United States Census Bureau, 2018, https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=ACSDP5Y2018.DP05%20Contra%20Costa%20County,%20California&g=0500000US06013&tid=ACSDP5Y2018.DP05&hidePreview=true; “Marin County, CA: ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates,” United States Census Bureau, 2018, https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=ACSDP5Y2018.DP05%20Marin%20County,%20California&g=0500000US06041&tid=ACSDP5Y2018.DP05&hidePreview=true; “Napa County, CA: ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates,” United States Census Bureau, 2018, https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=ACSDP5Y2018.DP05%20Napa%20County,%20California&g=0500000US06055&tid=ACSDP5Y2018.DP05&hidePreview=true; “San Francisco County, CA: ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates,” United States Census Bureau, 2018, https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=ACSDP5Y2018.DP05%20San%20Francisco%20County,%20California&g=0500000US06075&tid=ACSDP5Y2018.DP05&hidePreview=true; “San Mateo County, CA: ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates,” United States Census Bureau, 2018, https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=ACSDP5Y2018.DP05%20San%20Mateo%20County,%20California&g=0500000US06081&tid=ACSDP5Y2018.DP05&hidePreview=true; “Santa Clara County, CA: ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates,” United States Census Bureau, 2018, https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=ACSDP5Y2018.DP05%20Santa%20Clara%20County,%20California&g=0500000US06085&tid=ACSDP5Y2018.DP05&hidePreview=true; “Solano County, CA: ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates,” United States Census Bureau, 2018, https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=ACSDP5Y2018.DP05%20Solano%20County,%20California&g=0500000US06095&tid=ACSDP5Y2018.DP05&hidePreview=true; “Sonoma County, CA: ACS Demographic and Housing Estimates,” United States Census Bureau, 2018, https://data.census.gov/cedsci/table?q=ACSDP5Y2018.DP05%20Sonoma%20County,%20California&g=0500000US06097&tid=ACSDP5Y2018.DP05&hidePreview=true.

[ii] “Frequently Asked Questions: Indian Tribes and Tribal Communities in California,” California Tribal Court-State Court Forum, 2020, https://www.courts.ca.gov/3066.htm.

[iii] “Slave Trade: International Day of Remembrance of the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade,” UnitedNations.Org, https://www.un.org/en/observances/decade-people-african-descent/slave-trade; Henry Louis Gates Jr., “The African-American Migration Story,” PBS.org, 2013, https://www.pbs.org/wnet/african-americans-many-rivers-to-cross/history/on-african-american-migrations/.

[iv] Ron Dugan, “A Moving Border, and the History of a Difficult Boundary,” USA Today, 2017, https://www.usatoday.com/border-wall/story/us-mexico-border-history/510833001/; Bracero History Project, http://braceroarchive.org/about; Ramón A. Gutiérrez, Mexican Immigration to the United States, Oxford Research Encyclopedia of American History, July 29, 2019, https://oxfordre.com/americanhistory/view/10.1093/acrefore/9780199329175.001.0001/acrefore-9780199329175-e-146.

[v] Erika Lee, “The Chinese Are Coming. How Can We Stop Them? Chinese Exclusion and the Origins of American Gatekeeping,” in Asian American Studies Now, ed. Jean Yu-wen Shen Wu and Thomas C. Chen (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2012), 143–167, https://doi.org/10.36019/9780813549330.

[vi] “Great Migration African-American History,” Encyclopedia Britannica, last modified May 18, 2020, https://www.britannica.com/event/Great-Migration; Henry Louis Gates Jr., “The African-American Migration Story,” PBS.org, last modified October 18, 2013, https://www.pbs.org/wnet/african-americans-many-rivers-to-cross/history/on-african-american-migrations/.

[vii] Matt Bowling, “Japanese-American Internment: Palo Alto’s Deported Patriots,” PaloAltoHistory.org, 2012, http://www.paloaltohistory.org/japanese-american-internment.php.

[viii] “Frequently Asked Questions: Indian Tribes and Tribal Communities in California,” Judicial Council of California, California Tribal Court-State Court Forum, 2020, https://www.courts.ca.gov/3066.htm.

[ix] Kim-Mai Cutler, “East of Palo Alto’s Eden: Race and the Formation of Silicon Valley,” Techcrunch.com, January 10, 2015, https://techcrunch.com/2015/01/10/east-of-palo-altos-eden/; “History of Fair Housing,” Fair Housing Advocates of Northern California, http://www.fairhousingnorcal.org/history-of-fair-housing.html; Herbert G.Ruffin, “The California Fair Housing Act [The Rumford Act] (1963–1968),” Black Past, June 5, 2011, http://www.blackpast.org/african-american-history/california-fair-housing-act-rumford-act-1963-1968/.

[x] “Refugee Timeline,” US Citizenship and Immigration Services, last reviewed/updated July 28, 2020, https://www.uscis.gov/history-and-genealogy/featured-stories-uscis-history-office-and-library/refugee-timeline; Muzaffar Chishti, Faye Hipsman, and Isabel Ball, “Fifty Years On, the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act Continues to Reshape the United States,” MigrationPolicyInstitute.org, October 15, 2015, https://www.migrationpolicy.org/article/fifty-years-1965-immigration-and-nationality-act-continues-reshape-united-states.

[xi] Refugee Resettlement in California,” Refugee Council USA, January 1, 2019, https://rcusa.org/resources/state-by-state-refugee-resettlement/.

[xii] Kim-Mai Cutler, “East of Palo Alto’s Eden: Race and the Formation of Silicon Valley,” Techcrunch.com, January 10, 2015, https://techcrunch.com/2015/01/10/east-of-palo-altos-eden/; Louis Hansen, “Oakland, S.F. Neighborhoods Fastest Gentrifying in U.S.,” Mercury News (San Jose, CA), June 20, 2020, https://www.mercurynews.com/2020/06/18/oakland-s-f-neighborhoods-fastest-gentrifying-in-u-s/; “What Is the Nature of Gentrification, Displacement, and Exclusion in Global Cities?,” Urban Displacement Project, 2018, https://www.urbandisplacement.org/; Sue Dremann, “East Palo Alto Residents Protest Palo Alto Landlord’s Massive Rent Increase,” PaloAltoOnline.com, May 20, 2017, https://www.paloaltoonline.com/news/2017/05/18/east-palo-alto-residents-protest-palo-alto-landlords-massive-rent-increase; Melissa Navas, “The Harsh Reality of Gentrification,” University of San Francisco, May 12, 2020, https://www.usfca.edu/journal/divisadero/spring-2020/harsh-reality-of-gentrification.


 


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